Monday, March 24, 2014

Lenten Penance


Hello All,

Since the Baron and I are Catholic we have decided to sacrifice during this season of Lent.  We have both given up meat for the entirety of lent, he has given up sweet drinks, tea, and good coffee (he assures me the coffee at work is terrible and can not be enjoyed especially with no sugar or cream.)

We have also committed to helping out for our Parish's Stations of the Cross, meditation and soup supper.  This means I am making a meatless soup for everyone to share.   It is actually quite a nice thing and doesn't feel very penitential however it can sometimes be a inconvenience which is penitential.  I will try to post the recipes for the soup I made for the soup suppers.  The 1st soup I made was Soup Julienne.  It was quite nice and made a large quantity of soup.  This past week I made Shrimp and Corn Chowder.  It went over quite well.  I really enjoyed it also.

I have also made Saint Antorny of the Dessert soup the 1st week of Lent.  It was quite nice.  I had never used barly in a recipe before so it was a new expeiance for me.  I think I like it.  This also made alot of soup.  We ate on it for a few days.

I will try to keep up the recipes for soup suppers as well as any other new recipes I use try during my Lenten journey.

Quick Shrimp Chowder


Quick Shrimp Chowder


  • Ingredients
    2 tablespoons
     butter or margarine 
  • medium onion, chopped 
  • (10 3/4-ounce) cans cream of potato soup, undiluted
  • 3 1/2 cups milk 
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground red pepper
  • 1 1/2 pounds medium-size fresh shrimp, peeled
  • 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded Monterey Jack cheese
  • 1 can of extra sweet whole corn
  • Garnish: chopped fresh parsley

Preparation

  1. Melt butter in a Dutch oven over medium heat; add onion, and sauté 8 minutes or until tender. Stir in cream of potato soup, milk, and pepper; bring to a boil. Add shrimp; reduce heat, and simmer, stirring often, 5 minutes or just until shrimp turn pink. Stir in cheese until melted. Garnish, if desired. Serve immediately. Serve with oyster crackers, if desired.
  2. *1 1/2 pounds frozen shrimp, thawed; 1 1/2 pounds peeled crawfish tails; or 3 cups chopped cooked chicken may be substituted.

Soup Julienne

This was the 1st soup I made for out Parish's Friday way of the cross, meditation and soup supper. The Knight's of Columbus run the this event every year and the wives make meatless supper. It was quite a nice soup.  This soup makes about 3 quarts.  It is quite nice if not time consumming due to all the cutting of the veggies.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I have.


Soup Julienne

3 leeks (White part only)
4 carrots
2 medium turnips
1/2 medium head of green cabbage
1 onion
3 quarts water
3 bouillon cubs
salt and pepper to taste
1/3 cups frish parsley, minced

1 Shred the cabbage and cute the vetables into thin strips, 1 1/2 inch long, and place them in a large soup pot with the water.  Add Bouillon cubes and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat to medium, cover and cook the soup slowly for about 45 minutes, stirring from time to time.

When vegatables are done, add the salt, pepper and parsley; Stir few times, cover and simmer for another 15 additional minutes.  Serve hot.

Saint Antony of the Desert Soup

This was a great soup but it does may quite a bit of soup.  The recipe states it makes 4 serving.

Saint Antony of the Desert Soup
Ingredients
3 tablespoon oil of choice
1 cup of barley
1 carrot, finely grated
2 leeks, sliced
1 bay leaf
1/3 cup fresh parsely, minced
salt to taste
7 cups water
1 bouillon cube, if desired
chopped mushrooms, if desired

1) Heat the oil in a soup pot and add the barley, stirring continously for one minute. Immediately add the carrot, leeks, bay leaf, parsley, salt, and water.

2) Cook the soup over low the meduim heat, covered, for 40 to 45 minutes, until the barley is tender.  Add more water if needed. For extra taste, add the boullon and the mushrooms during the last 20 minutes of simmering.  Remove the bay leaf. Serve hot.


Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Maybe I'm back

Ok maybe I'm back but who knows.  It all depends on how busy my life gets.  I'll try to atleast update regarding great recipes and maybe put up some crafts I have completed from time to time.

The Baroness

Pasta salad

Note: This was a draft for a long while back that I forgot to post but now it's up.  So the date is wrong.



Today I made pasta salad for a potluck at church. The recipe is below. Unbelabley I did end up following the recipe as was.  (ok so it is my own recipe so maybe that's why I followed it.   Sorry no picture I forgot to take one before I left for the potluck and now it's gone. 



Seafood Salad


1 ½  pound shrimp, peel                                                                 
1 (16 ounces) package noodle shells (#27)
1 (12 ounces) package imitation crab meat, cubed
½ cup chives, finely chopped
1 cup mayonnaise (For some reason it sometimes need more than 1 cup)
1 cup frozen peas (optional)
black pepper to taste


Season shrimp and cook (without adding water) over medium heat 3 to 5 minutes.  Be careful not to over cook shrimp; drain and cool. Prepare noodles according to package directions; drain and rinse.  When shrimp and noodles are cooled combine all ingredients in a salad bowl; mix well.  Refrigerate and allow to chill thoroughly before serving.

You may wish to set a few shrimp aside in order to garnish

Thursday, December 6, 2012

A Re-post of last year's St. Nicholas Day post.


Re-post from last year. 


So today is St. Nicholas day. The Baron and I decided to celebrate by observing the traditional Catholic feast. This morning I woke up to gold balls in my shoes. (Ok, so it wasn't real gold it was gold chocolate balls. The Baron told me it was for my dowry so I wouldn't have to become a prostitute. Doubt there is concern of that happening at this point. )



A friend of mine got some wooden dolls of her children's patron Saints. She got them at St. Luke's Brush I thought they were great and decided to share.



I hope you all enjoy your Feast of St. Nicholas.



For those of my readers who don't know the legend associated with St. Nicholas and the traditions celebrated on his feast day I'll recount them here:
St. Nicks parents died when he was a young man, leaving him well off and he determined to devote his inheritance to works of charity. An opportunity soon arose. A citizen of Patara had lost all his money, and had moreover to support three daughters who could not find husbands because of their poverty; so the wretched man was going to give them over to prostitution. This came to the ears of Nicholas, who thereupon took a bag of gold and, under cover of darkness threw it in at the open window of the man's house. Here was a dowry for the eldest girl and she was soon duly married. At intervals Nicholas did the same for the second and third; at the last time the father was on the watch, recognized his benefactor and overwhelmed him with his gratitude.
There are many different St. Nicholas traditions depending on the country. As follows

The tradition of Saint Nicholas Day, usually on 6 December ( [O.S. 19 December (in most Orthodox countries)], is a festival for children in many countries in Europe related to surviving legends of the saint, and particularly his reputation as a bringer of gifts. The American Santa Claus, as well as the Anglo-Canadian and British Father Christmas, derive from these legends. "Santa Claus" is itself derived from the Dutch Sinterklaas.

France
St. Nicolas comes primarily in Alsace, Lorraine and Nord-Pas-de-Calais (French Flanders). St. Nicolas is patron of Lorraine. A little donkey carries baskets filled with children's gifts, biscuits (U.S. 'cookies') and sweets. The whole family gets ready for the saint's arrival on December 6, with grandparents telling stories of the saint. The most popular one is of three children who wandered away and got lost. Cold and hungry, a wicked butcher lured them into his shop where he attacked and salted them away in a large tub. Through the intervention of St. Nicolas the boys were restored to their families. This story led to Nicolas being recognized as the protector of children. In France statues and paintings often portray this event, showing the saint with children in a barrel. The evil butcher became Père Fouettard, who has followed St Nicolas in shame ever since. This story is also a popular French children's song. Meanwhile bakeries and home kitchens are a hive of activity as spiced gingerbread biscuits (U.S 'cookies') and mannala (a brioche shaped like the good saint) are baked. At school children learn St. Nicolas songs and poems and draw and paint St. Nicolas pictures and crafts. Saint Nicolas visits nursery schools, giving children chocolates and sometimes even a little present. Though Père Fouettard carries switches to threaten the children, what they really fear is that he may advise Saint Nicolas to pass them by on his gift-giving rounds.

Italy
On 6 December there is a ritual called the Rito delle nubili. The same tradition is currently observed in Sassari, where during the day of Saint Nicholas, patron of the city, gifts are given to young brides who need help before getting married.

Sinterklaas in the Netherlands in 2007
The Netherlands, Belgium, and Lower Rhineland (Germany)
Main article: Sinterklaas
In the Netherlands and Belgium, Saint Nicholas' Eve (5 December) is the primary occasion for gift-giving, when his reputed birthday is celebrated.

In the days leading up to 5 December (starting when Saint Nicholas has arrived by steamboat in late November), young children put their shoes in front of the chimneys and sing Sinterklaas songs. Often they put a carrot or some hay in the shoes, as a gift to St. Nicholas' horse. (In recent years the horse has been named Amerigo in The Netherlands and Slechtweervandaag in Flanders.) The next morning they will find a small present in their shoes, ranging from sweets to marbles or some other small toy. On the evening of 5 December, Sinterklaas brings presents to every child who has behaved well in the past year (in practice, just as with Santa Claus, all children receive gifts without distinction). This is often done by placing a bag filled with presents outside the house or living room, after which a neighbour or parent bangs the door or window, pretending to be Sinterklaas' assistant. Another option is to hire or ask someone to dress up as Sinterklaas and deliver the presents personally. Sinterklaas wears a bishop's robes including a red cape and mitre and is assisted by many mischievous helpers with black faces and colourful Moorish dress, dating back two centuries. These helpers are called 'Zwarte Pieten' ("Black Petes") or "Père Fouettard" in the French-speaking part of Belgium.

The myth is that, if a child had been naughty, the Zwarte Pieten put all the naughty children in sacks, and Sinterklaas took them to Spain (it is believed that Sinterklaas comes from Spain, where he returns after 5 December). Therefore, many Sinterklaas songs still allude to a watching Zwarte Piet and a judging Sinterklaas.

In the past number of years, there has been a recurrent discussion about the perceived politically incorrect nature of the Moorish helper. In particular Dutch citizens with backgrounds from Suriname and the Netherlands Antilles might feel offended by the Dutch slavery history connected to this emblem and regard the Zwarte Pieten to be racist. Others state that the black skin color of Zwarte Piet originates in his profession as a chimneysweep, hence the delivery of packages though the chimney. [21]

In recent years, Christmas (along with Santa Claus) has been pushed by shopkeepers as another gift-giving festival, with some success; although, especially for young children, Saint Nicholas' Eve is still much more important than Christmas. The rise of Father Christmas (known in Dutch as de Kerstman) is often cited as an example of globalisation and Americanisation.[22]
On the Frisian islands (Waddeneilanden), the Sinterklaas feast has developed independently into traditions very different from the one on the mainland.[23]
German speaking countries


Nikolaus-Umzug in Freiburg (Switzerland)
In Northern Germany, Nikolaus is usually celebrated on a small scale. Many children put a boot called Nikolaus-Stiefel (Nikolaus boot) outside the front door on the night of 5 December. St. Nicholas fills the boot with gifts and sweets overnight, and at the same time checks up on the children to see if they were good, polite and helpful the last year. If they were not, they will have a tree branch (Rute) in their boots instead.

Sometimes a Nikolaus impersonator also visits the children at school or in their homes and asks them if they have been good (sometimes ostensibly checking his golden book for their record), handing out presents on the basis of their behavior. This has become more lenient in recent decades, and this task is often taken over by the Weihnachtsmann (Santa Claus). In more catholic regions, Nikolaus is dressed very much like a bishop and rides on a horse, welcomed at public places by a large crowd.

Typical in the German speaking countries for Saint Nicholas Day is the Stutenkerl, a pastry made of sweet leavened dough.


Central Europe
In highly Catholic regions, the local priest was informed by the parents about their children's behaviour and would then personally visit the homes in the traditional Christian garment and threaten to beat them with a rod. In parts of Austria, Krampusse, who local tradition says are Nikolaus's helpers (in reality, typically children of poor families), roamed the streets during the festival. They wore masks and dragged chains behind them. These Krampusläufe (Krampus runs) still exist.

In Croatia, Nikolaus (Sveti Nikola) who visits on Saint Nicholas day (Nikolinje) brings gifts to children commending them for their good behavior over the past year and exhorting them to continue in the same manner in the year to come. If they fail to do so they will receive a visit from Krampus who traditionally leaves a rod, an instrument their parents will use to discipline them.


Mikulás in Ecka (Vojvodina - Serbia) brings joy to children in 2010.
In Czech and Slovakia, Mikuláš, in Poland Mikolaj and in Ukraine Svyatyi Mykolay is often also accompanied by an angel (andel/aniol/anhel) who acts as a counterweight to the ominous devil or Knecht Ruprecht (cert/czart). Additionally, in Poland children find the candy and small gifts under the pillow or in their shoes the evening of 5 December [O.S. 18 December (in Ukraine)] or the morning of 6 December [O.S. 19 December].

In Hungary and Romania, children typically leave their boots on the windowsill on the evening of 5 December. By next morning Nikolaus (Szent Miklós traditionally but more commonly known as Mikulás in Hungary or Mos Nicolae (Sfântul Nicolae) in Romania) leaves candy and gifts if they have been good, or a rod (Hungarian: virgács, Romanian: nuielusa) if they have been bad (most children end up getting small gifts, but also a small rod). In Hungary he is often accompanied by the Krampusz, the frightening helper who is out to take away the bad ones.
In Luxembourg, Kleeschen is accompanied by the Houseker a frightening helper wearing a brown monk's habit.

In Slovenia, Saint Nikolaus (Miklavž) is accompanied by an angel and a devil (parkelj) corresponding to the Austrian Krampus.
Greece, Serbia and Bulgaria


A modern metal icon of St. Nicholas by the Bulgarian artist Georgi 'Chapa' Chapkanov. Gilbert House, Stanley, Falkland Islands.


2006 Christmas stamp, Ukraine, showing St. Nicholas and children.
In Greece, Saint Nicholas does not carry an especial association with gift-giving, as this tradition is carried over to St. Basil of Cesarea, celebrated on New Year's Day. St. Nicholas being the protector of sailors, he is considered the patron saint of the Greek navy, military and merchant alike, and his day is marked by festivities aboard all ships and boats, at sea and in port. It is also associated with the preceding feasts of St. Barbara (4 December), St. Savvas (5 December), and the following feast of St. Anne (9 December); all these are often collectively called the "Nikolobárbara", and are considered a succession of days that heralds the onset of truly wintry cold weather in the country. Therefore by tradition, homes should have already been laid with carpets, removed for the warm season, by St. Andrew's Day (30 November), a week ahead of the Nikolobárbara.

In Serbia and among the Serbian people living across the world, Saint Nicholas is celebrated as patron saint of many families, and is as such celebrated in the tradition of Slava. Since the feast of Saint Nicholas always falls in the fasting period preceding the Christmas, the feast is celebrated according to the Eastern Orthodox Church fasting rules ("Post"). Fasting refers in this context to the eating of a restricted diet for reasons of religion. Saint Nicholas'"Slava" is the most celebrated by the Serbian people

In the Republic of Bulgaria, Saint Nicholas is one of the most celebrated saints. Many churches and monasteries are named after him. Saint Nicholas' day is celebrated as a holiday on the 6th of December.

Lebanon
Saint Nicholas is celebrated by all the Christian communities in Lebanon: Catholic, Greek Orthodox, and Armenian. Many places, churches, convents, and schools are named in honor of Saint Nicholas, such as Escalier Saint-Nicolas des Arts, Saint Nicolas Garden, and Saint Nicolas Greek Orthodox Cathedral.

Palestine
Saint Nicholas is the patron saint of the town of Beit Jala. This little town, which is located only two kilometers to the west of Bethlehem, boasts being the place where St. Nicholas spent four years of his life during his pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Every year on the 19th of December according to the Gregorian Calendar—that is the 6th of December according to the Julian Calendar—a solemn Divine Liturgy is held in the Orthodox Church of St. Nicholas, and is usually followed by parades, exhibitions, and many activities. Palestinian Christians of all sects, denominations and churches come to Beit Jala and participate in prayers and celebrations.

United States and Canada
While feasts of Saint Nicholas are not observed nationally, cities with strong German influences like Milwaukee, Cincinnati and St. Louis celebrate St. Nick's Day on a scale similar to the German custom.[24] As in other countries, many people in the United states celebrate a separate St Nicholas Day by putting their shoes outside their bedroom doors on the evening of 5 December. St Nicholas then comes during the night. On the morning of 6 December, those people will find their shoes filled with gifts and sugary treats. Widespread adoption of the tradition has spread among the German, Polish, Belgian and Dutch communities throughout the United States.
On 24 December, Christmas Eve, each child puts one empty stocking/sock on their fireplace. The following morning of 25 December, the children awake to find that St. Nick has filled their stockings with candy and small presents (if the children have been good) or coal (if not). Gifts often include chocolate gold coins to represent the gold St. Nick gave to the poor and small trinkets. They also awake to find presents under the tree, wrapped in Christmas-themed paper. This is a very traditional part of Christmas.